It's World Bee Day!

May 20, 2019

It's World Bee Day!

May 20 is World Bee Day - Save the Bees!

 

Why Is There Such a Thing as World Bee Day?

Well, who knows today is World Bee Day? I, sadly, did not! Considering most of Essentially Haitos' products include local raw honey, I should pay more attention to bees!

I was alerted to World Bee Day by Twitter - more specifically by Penn State's Twitter account. I read the entire article (referenced below if you are interested in reading the whole thing - it really is quite interesting given it is about bee research).

I'll do my best to hit the main points, what I think is truly interesting, and what we can do to help and protect the all important bee.

In the US alone, beekeepers have lost about 30% of their colonies every year since 2006. Many populations of wild bees are also showing declines, with many species now threatened or endangered.

Within the past decade, beekeepers across the globe have observed massive declines in managed honey bee populations. Similar declines have been observed in populations of wild bees and other pollinators.

According to researchers, honey bee populations in the United States and Europe have suffered large losses. Exposure to parasites and pesticides, climate change, a loss of the natural abundance of flora due to increased land-use, and habitat destruction are a few of the causes researchers associate with honey bee population decline.

What Does This Mean for Us?

Nearly 75% of major food crops - fruits, vegetables and nuts - depend on honey bees and other pollinators (ex. butterflies). This equals about one in every three bites of food we eat. In PA alone (where we live), these crops contribute $260 million to the economy annually.

"It is important to know that 90% of flowering plants use pollinators to set seed and produce fruit, which then supports other wildlife. Pollinators are vital for healthy ecosystems. By taking steps to help bees, we are also helping ourselves in the end."     ~Christina Grozinger, PSU, Distinguished Professor of Entomology

How We Can Help

  • Beescape.org is a site designed to allow individuals to assess the quality of their property and/or landscapes for supporting bee populations. This also helps the Center for Pollinator Research at PSU. Check it out! I will as soon as I finish writing this post!
  • If you are really interested in learning about bees, PSU has a Beekeeping 101 online course for anyone who wants to learn more about beekeeping. No experience required (although I think that is probably a given).
  • And if you are a teacher, which I used to be, the PSU Center for Science and the Schools created a week-long workshop to provide middle and high school teachers with resources to teach about pollinators in their classrooms.
  • Finally, I recommend NOT killing the bees buzzing around your backyards this summer!

Read the full article at https://impact.psu.edu 

     




    Leave a comment


    Also in Just the Essentials, Please

    Self-Care: 12 Ideas to Make it a Daily Practice
    Self-Care: 12 Ideas to Make it a Daily Practice

    February 12, 2020

    Whether you decide you want to go for a long walk, take a hot bath, or enjoy a good movie with friends, taking self-care time is imperative. Look for small ways you can incorporate it into everyday life. The more you can work self-care time into your schedule, the better you’ll be able to grow, enjoy your life, and thrive.

    Continue Reading

    Winter Skin - The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
    Winter Skin - The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

    January 28, 2020

    Ok, we all hate the sticky feeling our skin gets in uber-humid weather - but at least that humidity is good for your skin. Winter's lack of humidity and dry indoor heat is brutal on your skin - hence the term "winter skin". Read on to see what causes it and some simple, practical ways to combat it.

    Continue Reading

    Do What is in Your Control to Combat Cellulite
    Do What is in Your Control to Combat Cellulite

    November 06, 2019

    For the vast majority of women (close to 90%), cellulite is a fact of life. Despite it being quite normal and physically harmless, it is something we would rather do without. The science behind WHY we develop cellulite is complex - hormones and genetics - and therefore, ridding ourselves of it can be quite difficult. The ONLY thing we really have control over is our lifestyle choices that reduce its appearance. Read on to find what you can do to combat it on your own.

    Continue Reading